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The Student's Guide to Cognitive Neuroscience, 4th edition, 2020, Ward.
PART I - The Student's Guide to Cognitive Neuroscience exists of 1 part with 16 chapters
    1
Chapter 1 - Introducing cognitive neuroscience
    1
0 - Intro Chapter 1
    1
1 - Cognitive neuroscience in historical perspective

19 begrippen in deze sectie:

Cognition
Cognitive neuroscience
Mind-body problem
Dual-aspect theory
Dualism
Reductionism
Functional specialization
Phrenology
Cognitive neuropsychology
Information processing
Bottom-up processing
Domain specificity
Interactivity
Modularity
Neural network models
Parallel processing
Top-down processing
Nodes
Temporal resolution


    2
2 - Does cognitive psychology need the brain?

1 begrippen in deze sectie:

Spatial resolution


   10
3 - Does neuroscience need cognitive psychology?
   12
4 - From module to networks

2 begrippen in deze sectie:

Connectome
Graph theory


   13
5 - Summary and key points of Chapter 1
   16
Summary:

*
The mind-body problem refers to the question of how physical
matter (the brain) can produce mental experiences, and this
remains an enduring issue in cognitive neuroscience.

*
To some extent, the different regions of the brain are specialized
for different functions.

*
Functional neuroimaging has provided the driving force for
much of the development of cognitive neuroscience, but there
ia a danger in merely using these methods to localize cognitive
functions without understanding how they work.

*
Cognitive psychology has developed as a discipline without
making explicit references to the brain. However, biological
measures can provide an alternative source of evidence to inform
cognitive theory and the brain must provide constraining factors
on the nature and development of the information-processing
models of cognitive science.

*
Attempting to map the human connectome, and link it to
cognition, is the greatest challenge for the next generation of
cognitive neuroscientists. Although old concepts will remain (e.g.,
the idea of functional specialization), they may be understood in
entirely new ways.

   16
Resources:

Visit: for online resources:

*
References to key papers and readings

*
Video interviews on key topics with leading neuroscientists
Wilder Penfield and Michael Gazzaniga, and philosopher Ned Block

*
Multiple-choice questions and interactive flashcards to test
your knowledge

*
Downloadable glossary

   16
Example Essay Questions:

*
What is the "mind-body problem" and what frameworks
heve been put forward to solve it?

*
Is cognitive neuroscience the new phrenology?

*
Does cognitive psychology need the brain?
Does neuroscience need cognitive psychology?

   16
Recommended Literature:

*
Henson, R. (2005). What can functional neuroimaging tell the
experimental psychologist? Querterly Journal of Experimental
Psychology
, 58A, 193-233. An excellent summary of the role
of functional imaging in psychology and a rebuttal of common
criticisms. This debate can also be followed in a series of articles
in Cortex (2006, 42, 387-427).

*
Shallice, T., & Cooper, R.P. (2011). The organization of mind.
Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. The chapters on "conceptual
foundations" deal with many of the issues touched on in the
present chapter in more detail.

*
Uttal, W.R. (2001). The new phrenology: The limits of localizing
cognitive processes in the brain.
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. An
interesting overview of the methods and limitations of cognitive
neuroscience.

*
Wickens, A.P. (2015). A history of the brain: How we have come
to understand the most complex object in the universe.
New
York: Psychology Press. A good place to start for the history of
neuroscience.

   17
Chapter 2 - Introducing the brain
   18
0 - Intro Chapter 2
   18
1 - Structure and function of the neuron

8 begrippen in deze sectie:

Axon
Cell body
Dendrites
Neuron
Action potential
Neurotransmitters
Synapse
Myelin


   19
2 - The gross organization of the brain

13 begrippen in deze sectie:

Glia
Gray matter
White matter
Anterior
Corpus callosum
Dorsal
Inferior
Lateral
Medial
Posterior
Superior
Ventral
Ventricles


   24
3 - The cerebral cortex

3 begrippen in deze sectie:

Gyri (gyrus = singular)
Sulci (sulcus = singular)
Brodmann's areas


   28
4 - The subcortex

3 begrippen in deze sectie:

Basal ganglia
Limbic system
Thalamus


   30
5 - The midbrain and hindbrain

4 begrippen in deze sectie:

Cerebellum
Hypothalamus
Inferior colliculi
Superior colliculi


   32
6 - Summary and key points of Chapter 2

2 begrippen in deze sectie:

Medulla oblongata
Pons


   33
Summary:

*
The neuron is the basic cell type that supports cognition.
Neurons form a densely interconnected network of connections.
Axons send signals to other cells and dendrites receive signals.

*
Neurons code information in terms of a response rate. They
only respond in certain situations (determined by the input they
receive from elsewhere).

*
Neurons are grouped together to form gray matter (cell bodies)
and white matter (axons and other cells). The cortical surface
consists of a folded sheet of gray matter organized into two
hemispheres.

*
There is another set of gray matter in the subcortex that includes
the basal ganglia (important in regulating movement), the limbic
system (important for emotion and memory functions) and the
diencephalon (the thalamus is a sensory relay center and the
hypothalamus is concerned with hemostatic functions).

   33
Example Essay Questions:

*
How do neurons communicate with each other?

*
Describe how electrical and chemical signals are generated by
neurons.

*
Compare and contrast the different functions of the forebrain,
midbrain and hindbrain.

   33
Resources:

Visit: for online resources:

*
References to key papers and readings

*
Video interviews on key topics

*
Links to the interactive Neuroanatomy website and Harvard's MRI Brain Atlas

*
Multiple-choice questions and interactive flashcards to test
your knowledge

*
Downloadable glossary

   34
Recommended Literature:

*
Bear, M.F., Connors, B.W., & Paradiso, M.A. (2015).
Neuroscience: Exploring the brain (4th edition). Baltimore, MD:
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. A detailed book that covers all
aspects of neuroscience. It is recommenden for students whose
degree contains significant neuroscience components. The book
may be beyond the need of many psychology students.

*
Crossman, A.R., & Neary, D. (2014). Neuroanatomy: An illustrated
colour text
(5th edition). Edinburgh: Harcourt Publishers. A good
and clear guide that is not too detailed.

*
Pinel, J.P.J., & Edwards, M. (2007). A colorful introduction to the
anatomy of the human brain: A brain and psychology coloring book

(2nd edition). New York: Pearson. An active way of learning your
way around the brain.

   34
Chapter 3 - The electrophysiological brain
   35
0 - Intro Chapter 3
   35
1 - In search of neural representations: single-cell recordings
   36
2 - Electroencephalography and event-related potentials
   41
3 - Mental chronometry in electrophysiology and cognitive psychology
   46
4 - Magnetoencephalography
   52
5 - Summary and key points of Chapter 3
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2
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3
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4
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Chapter 4 - The imaged brain
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0 - Intro Chapter 4
   55
1 - Structural imaging
   56
2 - Functional imaging
   58
3 - From image to cognitive theory: experimental design
   63
4 - Analyzing data from functional imaging
   72
5 - Interpreting data from functional imaging
   75
6 - Why do functional imaging data sometimes disagree with lesion data?
   77
7 - Brain-reading: is "Big Brother" round the corner?
   80
8 - Summary and key points of Chapter 4
   86
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2
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3
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4
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Chapter 5 - The lesioned brain and stimulated brain
   87
0 - Intro Chapter 5
   87
1 - Dissociations and associations in neuropsychology
   90
2 - Single-case studies in cognitive neuropsychology
   93
3 - Group studies and lesion-deficit analysis in neuropsychology
   97
4 - Animal models in neuropsychology
  100
5 - Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)
  102
6 - Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES)
  110
7 - Summary and key points of Chapter 5
  114
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2
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3
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4
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Chapter 6 - The developing brain
  115
0 - Intro Chapter 6
  115
1 - Structural development of the brain
  118
2 - Functional development of the brain
  122
3 - Nature and nurture of individual differences
  129
4 - Summary and key points of Chapter 6
  142
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2
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3
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4
  142
Chapter 7 - The seeing brain
  143
0 - Intro Chapter 7
  143
1 - From eye to brain
  144
2 - Cortical blindness and "blindsight"
  149
3 - Functional specialization of the visual cortex beyond V1
  152
4 - Recognizing objects
  156
5 - Recognizing faces
  164
6 - Vision imagined
  171
7 - Summary and key points of Chapter 7
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2
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3
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4
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Chapter 8 - The hearing brain
  175
0 - Intro Chapter 8
  175
1 - The nature of sound
  177
2 - From ear to brain
  178
3 - Basic processing of auditory information
  181
4 - Music perception
  186
5 - Voice perception
  191
6 - Speech perception
  193
7 - Summary and key points of Chapter 8
  202
1
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2
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3
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4
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Chapter 9 - The attending brain
  203
0 - Intro Chapter 9
  203
1 - Spatial and non-spatial attentional process
  204
2 - The role of the frontoparietal network in attention
  208
3 - Theories of attention
  217
4 - Neglect as a disorder of spatial attention and awareness
  224
5 - Summary and key points of Chapter 9
  232
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2
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3
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4
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Chapter 10 - The acting brain
  233
0 - Intro Chapter 10
  233
1 - A basic cognitive framework for movement and action
  234
2 - The role of the frontal lobes in movement and action
  235
3 - Ownership and awareness of actions
  242
4 - Action comprehension and imitation
  246
5 - Acting on objects
  249
6 - Fronto-striatal and cerebellar networks in action
  258
7 - Summary and key points of Chapter 10
  264
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3
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4
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Chapter 11 - The remembering brain
  265
0 - Intro Chapter 11
  265
1 - Short-term and working memory
  266
2 - Different types of long-term memory
  271
3 - Amnesia
  273
4 - Functions of the hippocampus and medial temporal lobes in memory
  279
5 - Theories of remembering, knowing and forgetting
  287
6 - The role of the prefrontal cortex in long-term memory
  292
7 - Summary and key points of Chapter 11
  298
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3
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4
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Chapter 12 - The speaking brain
  299
0 - Intro Chapter 12
  299
1 - Spoken word recognition
  301
2 - Semantic memory and the meaning of words
  307
3 - Understanding and producing sentences
  316
4 - Retrieving and producing spoken words
  323
5 - Summary and key points of Chapter 12
  330
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2
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3
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4
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Chapter 13 - The literate brain
  331
0 - Intro Chapter 13
  331
1 - Visual word recognition
  334
2 - Reading aloud: routes from spelling to sound
  341
3 - Spelling and writing
  352
4 - Does spelling use the same mechanisms as reading?
  356
5 - Summary and key points of Chapter 13
  358
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3
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4
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Chapter 14 - The numerate brain
  359
0 - Intro Chapter 14
  359
1 - Universal numeracy?
  360
2 - The meaning of numbers
  362
3 - Models of number processing
  374
4 - Summary and key points of Chapter 14
  384
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3
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4
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Chapter 15 - The executive brain
  385
0 - Intro Chapter 15
  385
1 - Anatomical and functional divisions of the prefrontal cortex
  387
2 - Executive functions in practice
  390
3 - The organization of executive functions
  398
4 - The role of the anterior cingulate in executive functions
  411
5 - Summary and key points of Chapter 15
  414
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4
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Chapter 16 - The social and emotional brain
  415
0 - Intro Chapter 16
  415
1 - Theories of emotion
  416
2 - Neural substrates of emotion processing
  424
3 - Reading faces
  434
4 - Understanding other minds
  440
5 - Summary and key points of Chapter 16
  450
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3
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4
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